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Artist
A Certain Ratio
ReleaseProduct
A Certain Ratio Bundle
Label
Mute
Catalogue Number
STUMM406789
Release Date
December 11, 2020
  • Bundle:

    $94.99
    • I'd Like To See You Again Vinyl, 1×LP, Limited Coloured White vinyl

    • Sextet Vinyl, 1×LP, Limited Coloured White vinyl

    • To Each Vinyl, 1×LP, Limited Coloured White vinyl

    • The Graveyard And The Ballroom Vinyl, 1×LP, Limited Coloured White vinyl

    Available: December 11, 2020

The Graveyard And The Ballroom

A reissue from Mute of Manchester band A Certain Ratio’s debut album. First released on cassette in 1979, the group’s seminal post-punk and punk-funk sound captured the attention of many, influencing generations of bands to come. Recorded live at the Electric Ballroom in 1979 whilst sharing a bill with Joy Division, the album’s B-side showcases the raw energy of Jez Kerr’s morose vocals and Moscrop’s frantic guitar and trumpet performances. Pressed this time around on orange vinyl with coloured PVC sleeve to celebrate the band’s 40th anniversary.

To Each

Once you get past the fact that it opens with a song called ‘Felch’, A Certain Ratio’s sophomore LP proves itself to be one of the Mancunian post-punk band’s definitive works. Originally released in 1981, the record sees ACR seize Joy Division’s mantle as the leaders of northern gloom-groove. The likes of ‘My Spirit’ and ‘Back To The Start’ have clearly had a big influence on contemporary dance-punk groups like Golden Teacher. Produced by Martin Hannett, dontcha know.

Sextet

Mute’s A Certain Ratio reissues project rolls around to the group’s grandest statement. Even by their own high standards the Manchester band surpassed themselves on Sextet. Their third LP originally came out in 1982, two years after Talking Heads dropped Remain In Light and concurrently with the NYC groove experiments of ESG and Liquid Liquid. All of those sounds are present here, from dry bassline funk tracks like ‘Skipscada’ to the dub-punk of ‘Rialto. These hip strains are then fused with a distinctly English post-punk sensibility that sits somewhere between Public Image Limited’s Metal Box and The Clash’s Sandinista. Even after all these years it still sounds fresh.

I'd Like To See You Again

Trailblazing funky punks A Certain Ratio are having their albums reissued by Mute at the moment, the latest of which is their 1982 entry I’d Like To See You Again. Originally released by Factory, the group’s fourth LP shows off the full array of what the post-punk pioneers were capable of. It begins with one of their all-time classic grooves. In the popping bass, serrated-edge guitar and disco stomp of ‘Touch’ you hear the beginnings of everything from !!! to early Red Hot Chili Peppers. Across the rest of record we get weirdo-funk reminiscent of This Heat (‘Saturn’), dark takes on Philly soul (‘Hot Knights’) and fey art-punk that doffs a cap to contemporaries Orange Juice (‘I’d Like To See You Again’).

A Certain Ratio

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